Friday, June 1st, 2012

Fear of the Blank Page?

Stephanie

Reading back through the posts on our Rhodia Journal Swap Tumblr blog I came across an entry from early in the swap by Pam Hero:

“I LOVE a brand new notebook/sketchbook – it’s one of my ‘favorite’ things – yet I always have a feeling of hesitation and nervousness when confronted with a beautiful clean page.

Once again, I remind myself:

“Make up your mind to act decidedly and take the consequences.  No good is ever done in this world by hesitation” – Thomas Huxley

Page 1 – COMPLETE!

Fear and reservation has been replaced with excitement of possibility…”

I can’t tell you how often I hear from folks who talk about fear of the blank page – or more specifically, fear of the blank first page. Do you feel this way? Or are you able to rip off the plastic and get writing with reckless abandon?


20 thoughts on “Fear of the Blank Page?

  1. Sometimes I will start a new notebook by making the first page I write on a test page for the different pens that I want to use in the notebook. Then not only have I avoided some of the fear associated with making that first mark in a new notebook, I also have a page I can refer back to if I need to know whether or not a certain pen or ink will be suitable to use in that notebook (whether it feathers, bleeds, etc.). Like Kimberly mentioned in comment above, I don’t usually use the very first page as it is often unusable due to the way the book is bound. Sometimes I will also start with a couple pages at the back of the book just to get “warmed up” before I start writing at the front of the book.

  2. Sometimes I will start a new notebook by making the first page I write on a test page for the different pens that I want to use in the notebook. Then not only have I avoided some of the fear associated with making that first mark in a new notebook, I also have a page I can refer back to if I need to know whether or not a certain pen or ink will be suitable to use in that notebook (whether it feathers, bleeds, etc.). Like Kimberly mentioned in comment above, I don’t usually use the very first page as it is often unusable due to the way the book is bound. Sometimes I will also start with a couple pages at the back of the book just to get “warmed up” before I start writing at the front of the book.

  3. Hm… this gets me wondering…is the fear the first page of the notebook, that is blank in a new one. Or, the first blank page–which could be any of them in a new notebook, no matter how many pages skipped at the beginning before putting pen to page? That wondered, I usually do skip the first page–but not out of fear. Out of fussiness. I find that the first page often does not allow for complete flattening because of gluing or other binding issues. So, typically, I turn it and begin with page 2, which usually lays nice and flat

  4. Hm… this gets me wondering…is the fear the first page of the notebook, that is blank in a new one. Or, the first blank page–which could be any of them in a new notebook, no matter how many pages skipped at the beginning before putting pen to page? That wondered, I usually do skip the first page–but not out of fear. Out of fussiness. I find that the first page often does not allow for complete flattening because of gluing or other binding issues. So, typically, I turn it and begin with page 2, which usually lays nice and flat

  5. Since most fo my journalling is sequential when one is finished I have no problem starting a new one on the following day. My biggest problem is finding a new style of journal to try and having to wait until the one in service is finished.

  6. Since most fo my journalling is sequential when one is finished I have no problem starting a new one on the following day. My biggest problem is finding a new style of journal to try and having to wait until the one in service is finished.

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