Monday, December 5th, 2011

Moving from one to the next

Stephanie

“When I put stuff in my bag earlier in the day I was thinking oh…sad but true, it is time to retire this LeCarre and start a new one…just when it was getting good and broken in and filled with everything from my time in Mexico this summer to the beginning of a new school year and all the meetings in between.”

Kim from the blog Consider the Lilies sent me this and it got me to thinking about my own transitions from one notebook or journal to the next. When I start to get close to the end of a book, I start to get anxious – I want to finish it and move into the next one which will most certainly contain experiences even more interesting that the one I am currently working on – though this one included Hurricane Irene, the East Coast Earthquake, camping through a thunder & lightning storm, my return to the Rhythm Revival, applying (and receiving!) a local artist residency… with all of these things happening in the latter part of this year, I can’t imagine what I will experience next!

How do you feel about transitioning from one book to the next? Is there anything special that you do to “out with the old and in with the new?”


8 thoughts on “Moving from one to the next

  1. When I come to the end of my current journal, I use my label maker to put the dates on the inside cover (for easier future reference) and tuck it away in a plastic bin (easy storage and an attempt to keep them from getting musty). Then I start a new one with a typical inaugural (for me anyway) entry about coming to the start of a new journal and wondering what it will mean to someone someday. It sounds silly, but that’s just something I’ve fallen into over the years.

  2. When I come to the end of my current journal, I use my label maker to put the dates on the inside cover (for easier future reference) and tuck it away in a plastic bin (easy storage and an attempt to keep them from getting musty). Then I start a new one with a typical inaugural (for me anyway) entry about coming to the start of a new journal and wondering what it will mean to someone someday. It sounds silly, but that’s just something I’ve fallen into over the years.

  3. I’d feel sort of funny if I didn’t comment on this! (Thanks, Stephanie for using the snap and blurb!) If anyone looks at the journals I’ve kept over the years, they’d notice one thing–there are blank pages at the end. Why? The silly idea that I might, just might, be in the middle of a great thought and eek! no more pages. So, I stop at a complete thought with a cushion of a couple of pages. The new notebook or journal is a whole new adventure. Where will it travel with me? What might fill it? How long before writing in it feels as familiar as the old? Kind of like new jeans…

  4. I’d feel sort of funny if I didn’t comment on this! (Thanks, Stephanie for using the snap and blurb!) If anyone looks at the journals I’ve kept over the years, they’d notice one thing–there are blank pages at the end. Why? The silly idea that I might, just might, be in the middle of a great thought and eek! no more pages. So, I stop at a complete thought with a cushion of a couple of pages. The new notebook or journal is a whole new adventure. Where will it travel with me? What might fill it? How long before writing in it feels as familiar as the old? Kind of like new jeans…

  5. It’s funny that you bring this up, because I am just now finishing up my journal and need to start a new one. I have a lot of difficulty with it. I tend to “bond” with my journals as if they are a good friend. When I realize that I am nearing completion of the pages, I begin to get apprehensive about starting a new one. In fact, it becomes a deterrent to journaling. I don’t want to journal, because I don’t want to fill up the pages, and finish it. It’s strange. Interestingly, when I come back to my senses and begin journaling again, I always find it takes much longer to finish those pages than I thought, merely prolonging that experience. Inevitably, I end up closing the journal with just a couple of pages left, because I can’t bear the long goodbye anymore. So silly, yet so true.

  6. It’s funny that you bring this up, because I am just now finishing up my journal and need to start a new one. I have a lot of difficulty with it. I tend to “bond” with my journals as if they are a good friend. When I realize that I am nearing completion of the pages, I begin to get apprehensive about starting a new one. In fact, it becomes a deterrent to journaling. I don’t want to journal, because I don’t want to fill up the pages, and finish it. It’s strange. Interestingly, when I come back to my senses and begin journaling again, I always find it takes much longer to finish those pages than I thought, merely prolonging that experience. Inevitably, I end up closing the journal with just a couple of pages left, because I can’t bear the long goodbye anymore. So silly, yet so true.

  7. I hate starting a new notebook/diary/journal. Hate it.

    The first ink on that first page destroying the clean, fresh new page…it’s the same as seeing fresh snowfall (let’s keep this seasonal!) and then seeing the gritting lorry trundle by throwing grubby grit all over the place….the grit means that you can get where you need to go, you can start out on your journey, but the grit does destroy the pristine beauty of the fresh snowfall.

    It takes me a while to start a new book, what I am going to put on that first page has to be good, it has to be worth destroying that pristine new book for.

  8. I hate starting a new notebook/diary/journal. Hate it.

    The first ink on that first page destroying the clean, fresh new page…it’s the same as seeing fresh snowfall (let’s keep this seasonal!) and then seeing the gritting lorry trundle by throwing grubby grit all over the place….the grit means that you can get where you need to go, you can start out on your journey, but the grit does destroy the pristine beauty of the fresh snowfall.

    It takes me a while to start a new book, what I am going to put on that first page has to be good, it has to be worth destroying that pristine new book for.

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