Monday, November 7th, 2011

Fond Food Memories

Stephanie

My grandmother used to drink Folgers instant coffee. (The best part of wakin’ up, is Folgers in your cup!) She’s been gone since 2000 and I wonder what she’d think of all of the gourmet coffee available today. She had been a cook in a nursing home for 18 years somewhat of a food snob long before the Food Network started converting us. She’d go on group tours to other countries – to Italy to see the Sistine Chapel, ask her about the trip and she’d describe it by the food she ate.

I remember once sitting on her couch and watching a cooking show where they were making something with portabello mushrooms. I told her I wished I could make that dish but how portabellos (at the time) were pretty expensive. I couldn’t even get that out of my mouth before she is pulling a $10 bill from her change purse and pressing it into my hand. “Buy them” she says…

I really appreciate that she encouraged me to experiment in the kitchen. I only wish that I would have written down some of her recipes. She made a meatloaf that I still dream about – nothing has ever come close.

Is there anything that one of your relatives used to cook that you long for? Something that you have tried to replicate but cannot?

Photo courtesy of Mike Rodriquez.

14 thoughts on “Fond Food Memories

  1. Even in lives packed with unpleasant memories, food memories can be a saving grace. My Mom taught me to cook, but it was my beloved Auntie that taught me to love and care about food. That training and influence does not fade. A few simple ingredients, mixed with care and love can make all the difference. When you prepare food, never forget the most important ingredient: Love.

  2. Even in lives packed with unpleasant memories, food memories can be a saving grace. My Mom taught me to cook, but it was my beloved Auntie that taught me to love and care about food. That training and influence does not fade. A few simple ingredients, mixed with care and love can make all the difference. When you prepare food, never forget the most important ingredient: Love.

  3. I wish I could make my Granny’s treacle tart. The pastry was so short and so sweet it’d probably be banned by the EU as a danger to health. She made such fine breadcrumbs and definitely didn’t scrimp on the treacle and brown sugar. Heart failure on a plate, but just what you want on a cold winter night! Granny passed over ten years ago and I wish I’d been old and wise enough to get her to teach me the recipe because her treacle tart passed into history with her. Ah, memories…

  4. I wish I could make my Granny’s treacle tart. The pastry was so short and so sweet it’d probably be banned by the EU as a danger to health. She made such fine breadcrumbs and definitely didn’t scrimp on the treacle and brown sugar. Heart failure on a plate, but just what you want on a cold winter night! Granny passed over ten years ago and I wish I’d been old and wise enough to get her to teach me the recipe because her treacle tart passed into history with her. Ah, memories…

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