Wednesday, April 27th, 2011

Disappearing Pencils

Karen

I am a collector.  I have an old-fashioned apothecary jar full of marbles from my childhood, and others I have found at yard sales and antique stores.  An ancient candy jar holds my match collection  from restaurants, lounges, hotels and other places (no one offers matches anymore!).  I also collect monogrammed pencils from meetings, travel and events.

My writing collectibles–pencils and pens–are not put away on a shelf but are used every day.  Pens may change ink, but pencils diminish with every sharpening.

I took this photo of some of some my pencils (and my handy dinosaur sharpener!) to ask this question:  Do you feel a sense of wistfulness–even a little sadness–as your pencil begins to disappear?  I do, and I was wondering if others feel the same way.


16 thoughts on “Disappearing Pencils

  1. Thank you all for your wonderful comments! To answer TubbyMike’s question – I just let the memory fade as the pencil diminishes. That’s where the sadness comes in. A sense of loss both for the place and the tangible memory (the pencil). This is probably an awful heresy, but I am not a big fan of Rhodia pencils. They drive me nuts to try to sharpen. I watch them whirl around in the electric sharpener. I liked hearing where you keep your pencils. At home, I have a pencil holder my son made at Cub Scouts from a Campbell’s soup can and construction paper; and at work in a NY Mets Subway Series tin case.

  2. Thank you all for your wonderful comments! To answer TubbyMike’s question – I just let the memory fade as the pencil diminishes. That’s where the sadness comes in. A sense of loss both for the place and the tangible memory (the pencil). This is probably an awful heresy, but I am not a big fan of Rhodia pencils. They drive me nuts to try to sharpen. I watch them whirl around in the electric sharpener. I liked hearing where you keep your pencils. At home, I have a pencil holder my son made at Cub Scouts from a Campbell’s soup can and construction paper; and at work in a NY Mets Subway Series tin case.

  3. I’d have to agree with aeroblazer. Way too many writing utensils that are handed out complimentary are not used to their potential and end up in land fills. Finishing a pencil to its very end should be celebrated and not mourned.

  4. I’d have to agree with aeroblazer. Way too many writing utensils that are handed out complimentary are not used to their potential and end up in land fills. Finishing a pencil to its very end should be celebrated and not mourned.

  5. Apropos of this post and the “Re-purposing” post: I love my Rhodia pencils the most when they are down to about 4″–except I lose them. It used to upset me, until I started stashing them together (they are happy that way, too!) in a Newman’s Own Ginger Mints tin. Altoids tins are fine, too, but the Newman’s ginger has a fine dragon on the lid. So two of my favorite things come together; the pencils don’t get lost; I am no longer stressed!

  6. Apropos of this post and the “Re-purposing” post: I love my Rhodia pencils the most when they are down to about 4″–except I lose them. It used to upset me, until I started stashing them together (they are happy that way, too!) in a Newman’s Own Ginger Mints tin. Altoids tins are fine, too, but the Newman’s ginger has a fine dragon on the lid. So two of my favorite things come together; the pencils don’t get lost; I am no longer stressed!

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