Monday, April 18th, 2011

Do you have a favorite pen? Show me your pens!

Stephanie

Do you have a favorite pen or pencil that you can’t live without? If you snap a picture and send it to me, I will put together a gallery of all your favorites here on Rhodia Drive. Send pictures to stephanie at rhodiadrive dot com and include in the subject line “This is my favorite pen.” Also be sure to tell me what kind of pen/pencil it is, and 1 per person please!


28 thoughts on “Do you have a favorite pen? Show me your pens!

  1. My Parker 25 is a fine example of American 1970s modernist design that recalls a unique retro-futuristic (“zeerust”-y) aesthetic. Fed a steady diet of Sheaffer turquoise, it’s an exceptionally well behaved pen, adequate on all but the single worst package of paper of my entire life. The nib is a bit of a nail, with no real flex or springiness to speak of, but it’s dead reliable and fairly well behaved, only rarely causing a case of inky-fingers. This was my first serious fountain pen, and continues to see fairly heavy use (though at present, I’m trying to run down a charge of ink in another pen). It has a peculiar behavior on Moleskine paper, though – the writing feathers, but the ink spreads out in tiny little hairlines spaced only one or two every few millimeters. It’s a fascinating thing to watch, and unlike most feathering, actually adds character to the writing.

    My new Twsbi Diamond 530 (actually, one of the first thirty to be produced, a “public beta” unit) was a bit of a diamond in the rough when I got it. Its previous owner sold it because it leaked like a sieve. After modifying it with the third-generation piston and switching to a heavier pool-grade silicone/teflon lubricant, it’s been almost bulletproof. the “extra-fine” lays a heavier line than the “fine” parker, and makes a great many inks shade beautifully, and with just a hint of flex it’s a joy to write with, if a little more prone to feathering than the Parker, but it makes that turquoise look *so* good on Rhodia paper. Since the investment of time and ingenuity in this pen makes it special to me, I have to call this one tied for first.

    Honorable mention goes to my new-old Cross Classic Century pen. I haven’t had it long enough to develop a true attachment to it yet, but its springy, buttery-smooth nib is a joy to write with and its body is unusually thin for my fountain pens, a nice change for when a massive writing or study session threatens hand-cramps. Since I’m prone to ’em, this seems headed toward becoming part of a trifecta.

  2. My Parker 25 is a fine example of American 1970s modernist design that recalls a unique retro-futuristic (“zeerust”-y) aesthetic. Fed a steady diet of Sheaffer turquoise, it’s an exceptionally well behaved pen, adequate on all but the single worst package of paper of my entire life. The nib is a bit of a nail, with no real flex or springiness to speak of, but it’s dead reliable and fairly well behaved, only rarely causing a case of inky-fingers. This was my first serious fountain pen, and continues to see fairly heavy use (though at present, I’m trying to run down a charge of ink in another pen). It has a peculiar behavior on Moleskine paper, though – the writing feathers, but the ink spreads out in tiny little hairlines spaced only one or two every few millimeters. It’s a fascinating thing to watch, and unlike most feathering, actually adds character to the writing.

    My new Twsbi Diamond 530 (actually, one of the first thirty to be produced, a “public beta” unit) was a bit of a diamond in the rough when I got it. Its previous owner sold it because it leaked like a sieve. After modifying it with the third-generation piston and switching to a heavier pool-grade silicone/teflon lubricant, it’s been almost bulletproof. the “extra-fine” lays a heavier line than the “fine” parker, and makes a great many inks shade beautifully, and with just a hint of flex it’s a joy to write with, if a little more prone to feathering than the Parker, but it makes that turquoise look *so* good on Rhodia paper. Since the investment of time and ingenuity in this pen makes it special to me, I have to call this one tied for first.

    Honorable mention goes to my new-old Cross Classic Century pen. I haven’t had it long enough to develop a true attachment to it yet, but its springy, buttery-smooth nib is a joy to write with and its body is unusually thin for my fountain pens, a nice change for when a massive writing or study session threatens hand-cramps. Since I’m prone to ’em, this seems headed toward becoming part of a trifecta.

  3. My Eversharp Skyline demi sized pen, vintage 1945, with a Cursive Italic nib by Pendleton Brown of Atlanta. Classic design, dependable even on airplanes, and wonderful writer with the Pendleton Point nib.

  4. My Eversharp Skyline demi sized pen, vintage 1945, with a Cursive Italic nib by Pendleton Brown of Atlanta. Classic design, dependable even on airplanes, and wonderful writer with the Pendleton Point nib.

  5. A beat up Lamy Safari with a Pendleton point fine italic. Writes like a dream! Check out Pendleton Brown’s posts(pb2) on FPN.

  6. A beat up Lamy Safari with a Pendleton point fine italic. Writes like a dream! Check out Pendleton Brown’s posts(pb2) on FPN.

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