Monday, March 7th, 2011

Orange Train Engine #6272

Stephanie

orange train

Back when I was in high school, (1984ish) I watched a program on PBS about graffiti as an art form and I’ve never looked at it the same way since. There are trains that run through my town and if I am in one of the local parks where they happen to pass through, I’ll sit and watch them as they go by just to look at the graffiti. In some ways, it makes me sad because I see such beautiful art and wish the people creating it had access to a legal way to express themselves – though perhaps this is a chosen way of self expression because of it’s ability to be seen far away from where it was originally created.

What are your feelings on graffiti art?

Image courtesy of Flickr member ohkayor

10 thoughts on “Orange Train Engine #6272

  1. Graffiti is vandalism, not art. Some idiot has decided to deface someone else’s private property (in the case of a train) or the public property (seawalls, sidewalks, etc) that belongs to all of us. Would graffiti be as appealing if it were carved into the trunk of a redwood tree rather than spray-painted onto a boxcar?

    “I . . . wish the people creating it had access to a legal way to express themselves”
    They do. They can express themselves on the walls of their own home if that’s their urge. And one would think that if they can get hold of spray paint, they can get hold of stuff like paper and a brush, or a piece of cardboard to do their spraypainting on. Check out some of the “spray paint art” videos on Youtube for examples of what can be done.

  2. Graffiti is vandalism, not art. Some idiot has decided to deface someone else’s private property (in the case of a train) or the public property (seawalls, sidewalks, etc) that belongs to all of us. Would graffiti be as appealing if it were carved into the trunk of a redwood tree rather than spray-painted onto a boxcar?

    “I . . . wish the people creating it had access to a legal way to express themselves”
    They do. They can express themselves on the walls of their own home if that’s their urge. And one would think that if they can get hold of spray paint, they can get hold of stuff like paper and a brush, or a piece of cardboard to do their spraypainting on. Check out some of the “spray paint art” videos on Youtube for examples of what can be done.

  3. I live in an English seaside town. There is no problem with ‘art’ drawn on the promenade using fallen chalk from the cliffs. Idiots who deface our seawalls and various fixtures with spray paint are not artists, they are infantile vandals who cost us all serious money as the town is kept clean. A true artist uses their own or supplied media, he or she doesn’t deface what doesn’t belong to them. Graffiti is not art.It is not talent. It is not clever and, it is not wanted by the owners of property that is defaced.

  4. I live in an English seaside town. There is no problem with ‘art’ drawn on the promenade using fallen chalk from the cliffs. Idiots who deface our seawalls and various fixtures with spray paint are not artists, they are infantile vandals who cost us all serious money as the town is kept clean. A true artist uses their own or supplied media, he or she doesn’t deface what doesn’t belong to them. Graffiti is not art.It is not talent. It is not clever and, it is not wanted by the owners of property that is defaced.

  5. There’s some nice graffiti in the train tunnels around Boston. My favorite is the “square” graffiti–there is some very lovely lettering reading “Go Red Sox!” and “Happy Halloween!” It pretties up the cement walls, and even better, the wording isn’t offensive! (Well, except to Yankees fans)

  6. There’s some nice graffiti in the train tunnels around Boston. My favorite is the “square” graffiti–there is some very lovely lettering reading “Go Red Sox!” and “Happy Halloween!” It pretties up the cement walls, and even better, the wording isn’t offensive! (Well, except to Yankees fans)

  7. I’ll give a slightly different perspective: I love trains, I love to read about them, watch them, and photograph them when I can. It’s not as prevalent today but the colors and paint schemes of locomotives are unique to each company and are art in their own right. I also enjoy reading and deciphering the logos and writings on box cars and tank cars and such. It can be a bit of a window into railroading history as you can see names of railroads that no longer exist that once owned that equipment. I view graffiti on trains as a defacing something that I view as form of art. I don’t enjoy it at all.

  8. I’ll give a slightly different perspective: I love trains, I love to read about them, watch them, and photograph them when I can. It’s not as prevalent today but the colors and paint schemes of locomotives are unique to each company and are art in their own right. I also enjoy reading and deciphering the logos and writings on box cars and tank cars and such. It can be a bit of a window into railroading history as you can see names of railroads that no longer exist that once owned that equipment. I view graffiti on trains as a defacing something that I view as form of art. I don’t enjoy it at all.

  9. “I see such beautiful art and wish the people creating it had access to a legal way to express themselves – though perhaps this is a chosen way of self expression because of it’s ability to be seen far away from where it was originally created.”

    Legal + something/somewhere where the artists are comfortable? Grenoble France has a half mile stretch of concrete alongside a cyclepath by the river which is a regular haunt of the artists.
    Like you, many stop to admire it.

    Each work is painted over many times over the course of the year, perhaps auto self selection?

    Needs a very modern town to provide such an outlet I guess. Why not ask?
    They can only say no

  10. “I see such beautiful art and wish the people creating it had access to a legal way to express themselves – though perhaps this is a chosen way of self expression because of it’s ability to be seen far away from where it was originally created.”

    Legal + something/somewhere where the artists are comfortable? Grenoble France has a half mile stretch of concrete alongside a cyclepath by the river which is a regular haunt of the artists.
    Like you, many stop to admire it.

    Each work is painted over many times over the course of the year, perhaps auto self selection?

    Needs a very modern town to provide such an outlet I guess. Why not ask?
    They can only say no

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