Thursday, February 10th, 2011

What’s your bag?

Stephanie

I have a real affinity for bags. Not purses per se, as I haven’t really carried anything resembling a woman’s purse for at least a decade. I like mini-backpacks, small messenger bags and some of the urban sling style bags. One of my favorite bags is an old Eagle Creek bag meant to be used for carrying binocularswhich I have used as such, along with a time-worn copy of Peterson’s Bird Guide. I have a couple of Mountainsmith totes that I use for lugging books back & forth from the library-  super sturdy things with a rubberized bottom. The small one works great as a purse/lunch bag. One of the ways I find out about bags that I might want, er, uh, I mean serve a practical purpose in my life (in case my husband is reading this) is from Flickr’s photo group entitled “What’s in your bag.”

Do you have a favorite bag?

Got pictures of Rhodia in your bag? Send them to me at stephanie@rhodiadrive.com. Image of the satchel above provided by our friend Halden.


18 thoughts on “What’s your bag?

  1. I use an LL Bean day pack that my wife got me for Christmas a couple years ago. It has “Lanz” embroidered on it. It’s blue, to match the mighty Jeep Wrangler I drive. My journal is always in it (unless of course I’m writing).

  2. I use an LL Bean day pack that my wife got me for Christmas a couple years ago. It has “Lanz” embroidered on it. It’s blue, to match the mighty Jeep Wrangler I drive. My journal is always in it (unless of course I’m writing).

  3. Chrome messenger bags, because they’ve got reflective straps and are waterproof on the sides where the flap connects with the bag. I have Timbuk2 messenger bags, several actually, before I found out about Chrome. My stuff would get wet, so I’d put plastic shopping bags in my bag for when it would rain, I could cover my goods.

    I love the Chrome seatbelt strap function, for ease of taking the bag off.

  4. Chrome messenger bags, because they’ve got reflective straps and are waterproof on the sides where the flap connects with the bag. I have Timbuk2 messenger bags, several actually, before I found out about Chrome. My stuff would get wet, so I’d put plastic shopping bags in my bag for when it would rain, I could cover my goods.

    I love the Chrome seatbelt strap function, for ease of taking the bag off.

  5. For the longest time, if I needed a receptacle that was larger than a pocket, my bag was my decade-old blue Jansport backpack. I never found a purse that I felt fit my needs or my (lack of) style, and I didn’t want to buy something new that I would only use sporadically.

    Then I started getting the Levenger catalog. I still didn’t like any of the purses or even the bags explicitly marketed toward women, but I saw the Rustica Gear Pack and I was in love. Now, that bag goes absolutely everywhere with me, and it is large enough to hold the things I might actually need–pens, notebooks, my netbook–but small enough to keep me from becoming a pack mule, as I am wont to do. It forces me to actually consider what I am taking with me, to make sensible choices about productivity, and to be kinder to my back and shoulders. It was a bit of a splurge for me, purchase-wise, but given the use it’s seen and its durability and good looks so far, I think it was certainly worth it.

  6. For the longest time, if I needed a receptacle that was larger than a pocket, my bag was my decade-old blue Jansport backpack. I never found a purse that I felt fit my needs or my (lack of) style, and I didn’t want to buy something new that I would only use sporadically.

    Then I started getting the Levenger catalog. I still didn’t like any of the purses or even the bags explicitly marketed toward women, but I saw the Rustica Gear Pack and I was in love. Now, that bag goes absolutely everywhere with me, and it is large enough to hold the things I might actually need–pens, notebooks, my netbook–but small enough to keep me from becoming a pack mule, as I am wont to do. It forces me to actually consider what I am taking with me, to make sensible choices about productivity, and to be kinder to my back and shoulders. It was a bit of a splurge for me, purchase-wise, but given the use it’s seen and its durability and good looks so far, I think it was certainly worth it.

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