Friday, November 12th, 2010

Being Open to Experience

Stephanie

This year has been absolutely amazing for me because I allowed myself to be open to experience. Gone are the days when I second guess everything or blindly pass judgments because I live in fear. This has been part of a five year journey which I expect to continue for the rest of my life. Why am I sharing this? Because it all began with the djembe. Ever see the movie The Visitor? It’s about a man who changes the course of his life by learning to play an African drum called a djembe. The djembe is also known as the “healing drum” and there have been studies that show that not only does drumming reduce stress, it also can actually assist in healing disease. For me, it taught me about openness. To shut down my mind and to be in this moment right now

Want to hear something interesting? Both my writing and my art happened around the same time I started drumming. Have you ever tried it? It just might open up a whole new world of possibility to you!

Image above was taken at The Great Rhythm Revival in Sherman, NY this past September – Image courtesy of John Patrick Gatta.

6 thoughts on “Being Open to Experience

  1. I did see The Visitor and really enjoyed it. I wonder if the experience of learning any instrument would be the same as learning the djembe. Is it just the drum or the communal activity that changes us? Not far from where I grew up, families and friends would routinely get together and play bluegrass or other types of folk music on a regular basis. I have observed, but never been a participant in those impromptu jam sessions. In other regions of the world, it is common for people to sing together. Americans have no such heritage. What does that say about our society? What does that say about our collective personalities? In spite of all the digital ways that we are connected, are we really more isolated from one another than the rest of the world?

  2. I did see The Visitor and really enjoyed it. I wonder if the experience of learning any instrument would be the same as learning the djembe. Is it just the drum or the communal activity that changes us? Not far from where I grew up, families and friends would routinely get together and play bluegrass or other types of folk music on a regular basis. I have observed, but never been a participant in those impromptu jam sessions. In other regions of the world, it is common for people to sing together. Americans have no such heritage. What does that say about our society? What does that say about our collective personalities? In spite of all the digital ways that we are connected, are we really more isolated from one another than the rest of the world?

  3. The very same thing happened to me starting with the movie The Visitor. I drum every week and each time I feel a lowering of preconceived notions and, therefor, barriers of all kinds. My photography is blossoming at the same time. Forward we go!

  4. The very same thing happened to me starting with the movie The Visitor. I drum every week and each time I feel a lowering of preconceived notions and, therefor, barriers of all kinds. My photography is blossoming at the same time. Forward we go!

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