Friday, October 8th, 2010

Your Feedback: Write a Letter?

Stephanie

In response to our recent post, “Write a Letter?” we received a message from a man named Frank that said:

“I agree that written letters seem more personal and convey a different feeling than email. I write letters when I want my reader to “hold something in his/her hands,” thereby getting a tactile sense as well as a visual sense from the writing. Seeing the loops and curls draws the reader into the letter, requires a different involvement, and creates a different investment in connection than email. Email is plain vanilla and quick. To some, writing a letter means, “I’m willing to invest the time to write this, and ask that you invest time to read what I’ve written.” And it can say that I care enough about you and the subject to personalize it.”

You know, as silly as it might sound, I never really thought about how much joy the physical letter could bring to the recipient.

I think it’s time to start writing a few letters…. How about you?


16 thoughts on “Your Feedback: Write a Letter?

  1. The seductive ease of use and (almost) instant gratification of electronic tools has pulled us away from the simple joys of taking the time to think and write, and the surprising satisfaction of personalized communication. Kitty Burns Florey writes an excellent review of this lost pleasure in “Script and Scribble – The Rise and Fall of Handwriting” (Melville House Publishing, 2009) and your readers would enjoy and be inspired by her work. Handwritten letters may be old school, but on many occasions, they demonstrate best manners.

  2. The seductive ease of use and (almost) instant gratification of electronic tools has pulled us away from the simple joys of taking the time to think and write, and the surprising satisfaction of personalized communication. Kitty Burns Florey writes an excellent review of this lost pleasure in “Script and Scribble – The Rise and Fall of Handwriting” (Melville House Publishing, 2009) and your readers would enjoy and be inspired by her work. Handwritten letters may be old school, but on many occasions, they demonstrate best manners.

  3. I think letter writing is becoming something of a lost art. Some people seem to appreciate receiving a handwritten letter, but aren’t inclined to make the effort to reply in kind.

    I look at the handwritten letter as a gift to be saved and read again later. Technology is great, but putting pen to paper can’t be replaced by pixels. Pixels are more expedient but not always appropriate.

  4. I think letter writing is becoming something of a lost art. Some people seem to appreciate receiving a handwritten letter, but aren’t inclined to make the effort to reply in kind.

    I look at the handwritten letter as a gift to be saved and read again later. Technology is great, but putting pen to paper can’t be replaced by pixels. Pixels are more expedient but not always appropriate.

  5. I miss writing and receiving letters so much! I have one or two people I can send a letter to, but most people these days seem to regard it as a bother, and so even if I send them a letter, they will reply via email. The implication being, “Please, don’t try to drag me back into the last century! Can’t you see I’m too busy to use that old technology when the new technology is right here at hand?”

  6. I miss writing and receiving letters so much! I have one or two people I can send a letter to, but most people these days seem to regard it as a bother, and so even if I send them a letter, they will reply via email. The implication being, “Please, don’t try to drag me back into the last century! Can’t you see I’m too busy to use that old technology when the new technology is right here at hand?”

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